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Senator Levin continues to push corporate welfare for the war industry in Michigan

December 19, 2012

military-industrial-complex

As we have pointed out on previous occasions, Michigan Senator Carl Levin, in his role as Chairmen of the Armed Services Committee, has worked hard to get public tax dollars to fund the military industrial complex.

In a statement he released yesterday on the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013, Levin said:

“This bill fulfills our obligations to defend our nation and to provide for our troops and their families, and I’m proud Michigan will make a major contribution to that effort. Our state’s manufacturing, science and engineering strengths have long helped keep our nation safe, and that legacy continues with this bill.”

The bill includes $173.5 million dollars alone for Army combat vehicle research at the TARDEC facility in Warren, Michigan.

The bill also includes a total of $200.0 million for the Department of Defense’s Rapid Innovation Program (RIP). Funding authorized for the RIP could provide significant opportunities for Michigan companies, universities, and other organizations to further research and development efforts with the Department of Defense.

Levin’s statement also said that the bill would bring $2 billion to universities in Michigan to do research for the Department of Defense, although no universities are indentified in the statement.

All of this funding combined is just another example of how much the US economy is dependent on the military industrial complex. It also demonstrates Senator Levin’s continued commitment to being a champion of US imperialism by making sure that the US government outspends every nation in the world for military purposes, in order to maintain the thousands of bases and US troop deployments all over the globe.military ind

Here is a more detailed list of which Michigan companies get a free ride in the latest Defense Bill:

  • $374.3 million for the Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV). Meritor of Troy, AAR Mobility of Cadillac, and a number of other Michigan companies are involved in the production of FMTVs.
  • $347.7 million for the Army’s Stryker armored vehicle. General Dynamics Land Systems of Sterling Heights is the prime contractor for the Stryker armored vehicle. Many Michigan companies serve as suppliers in support of this program.
  • $271.0 million for High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) recapitalization. Many Michigan companies support the HMMWV program as suppliers.
  • $339.5 million for the Abrams Main Battle Tank program, including $136.0 million above the budget request for tank upgrades and to mitigate risk in the armored vehicle industrial base. General Dynamics Land Systems of Sterling Heights is the prime contractor for the Abrams program and more than 200 Michigan companies serve as suppliers.
  • $31.7 million for the Lightweight 155mm Howitzer. Howmet Castings of Whitehall is a major contractor for the Lightweight 155mm Howitzer program.
  • $54.9 million for the Family of Heavy Tactical Vehicles. Detroit Diesel manufactures and supplies the engine for this program.
  • $927.4 million for Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle modifications. Spartan Chassis of Charlotte, Meritor of Troy, and Demmer Corporation of Lansing and many other Michigan companies are involved in this program.
  • $288.2 million for Bradley Fighting Vehicle upgrades modifications, including $140.0 million above the budget request to accelerate Bradley modifications included in the approved engineering change proposal and to assist with the mitigation of risk in the armored vehicle industrial base. L-3 of Muskegon is a major contractor for the Bradley program.
  • $169.9 million for the M88A2 Improved Recovery Vehicle, including $62.0 million above the budget request. L-3 of Muskegon is a major contractor for the Improved Recovery Vehicle program.
  • $1.8 billion for Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) construction, supporting the Navy’s acquisition strategy. Marinette Marine, just across the Michigan border in Wisconsin, is one of two shipyards building LCS and employs several hundred Michigan residents and relies on many Michigan suppliers.

 

 

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