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Top 25 Censored Stories of the Year

October 11, 2012

Every year Project Censored publishes the Top 25 Censored Stories. The top censored stories over the past year cover a variety of topics and demonstrate once again how many of the major issues of the day are either ignored or suppressed by the corporate media.

This year’s Top 25 Censored stories include articles on the growing US police state, the degrading condition of oceans, Trillions in Loans to US banks, NATO War Crimes in Libya, Education Reform as Privatization and Wachovia Bank’s role in laundering money for drug cartels in Latin America.

Between 2004 and 2007, Wachovia Bank handled funds totaling $378.4 billion for Mexican currency-exchange houses acting on behalf of drug cartels. The transactions amount to the largest violation of the Bank Secrecy Act, an anti-money-laundering law, in US history. This case is not exceptional; Wachovia is just one of several US and European banks that drug cartels have used to launder money.

Another censored story deals with how FBI agents are responsible for a majority of terrorist plots in the US.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has embarked on an unusual approach to ensure that the United States is secure from future terrorist attacks. The agency has developed a network of nearly 15,000 spies to infiltrate various communities in an attempt to uncover terrorist plots. However, these moles are actually assisting and encouraging people to commit crimes. Many informants receive cash rewards of up to $100,000 per case.

The New York Police are planting drugs on innocent people to meet arrest quotas is yet another censored news story.

A host of stories document how the New York Police Department operates outside the very laws it is charged with enforcing. In October 2011, a former NYPD narcotics detective testified that he regularly saw police plant drugs on innocent people as a way to meet arrest quotas. The NYPD’s controversial “stop and frisk” program has invested seventy-five million dollars to arrest suspects for possessing minimal amounts of marijuana. Each arrest costs approximately $1,000 to $2,000. Although NYPD use of unlawful restraints and disproportionate force to arrest peaceful Occupy protesters has received some news coverage, police brutality directed against people of color continues to go underreported.

One last story is about HR 347, legislation, which would make many forms of non-violent protest illegal.

In March 2012, President Obama signed into law HR 347, the Federal Restricted Buildings and Grounds Improvement Act of 2011. The law specifies as criminal offenses the acts of entering or remaining in areas defined as “restricted.” Although pundits have debated to what extent the new law restricts First Amendment rights or criminalizes Occupy protests, it does make it easier for the Secret Service to overuse or misuse existing laws to arrest lawful protesters

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